Black History Skits

    black history

  • African-American history is the portion of American history that specifically discusses the African American or Black American ethnic group in the United States. Most African Americans are the descendants of captive Africans held in the United States from 1619 to 1865.
  • Hip Hop History is a rap album by Master P and his son, Romeo. It includes guest performances by Tank, Lil Boosie, Playa, Bblak, Mizz Kitty, Young V and Marques Houston. The album has sold 32,000 worldwide

    skits

  • (Skit (rap)) A hip hop skit is a form of sketch comedy that appears on a hip hop album, and is usually written and performed by the artists themselves. Skits can appear on albums as individual tracks, or at the beginning or end of a song.
  • A short comedy sketch or piece of humorous writing, esp. a parody
  • (skit) a short theatrical episode
  • Sketch comedy consists of a series of short comedy scenes or vignettes, called “sketches,” commonly between one and ten minutes long. Such sketches are performed by a group of comic actors, either on stage or through an audio and/or visual medium such as broadcasting.

black history skits

black history skits – Children and

Children and Youth Say So!: Skits, Recitation & Drill Team Poetry for Black History Month, Kwanzaa Other Celebrations in Church
Children and Youth Say So!: Skits, Recitation & Drill Team Poetry for Black History Month, Kwanzaa Other Celebrations in Church
This book contains skits, recitations, and poetry for celebrations that have special meaning in many African American churches. Churches of all backgrounds will benefit from having accessible material with which to lift up and celebrate prominent persons and events in the African American experience. The material can be utilized during the Sunday School hour or during the worship service and is geared toward children and youth, but not exclusive of adults. This resource highlights many special days celebrated in the African American church. It also includes creative presentations (litany, poem, short speech) that highlight persons and events in Black History. These can be utilized to celebrate Black History Month in any church that wishes to become more multicultural in its scope. Each resource also includes one recitation in the form of a rap to provide a selection for a church drill team. Available June 2006.
Celebrations include:
I. Kwanzaa
II. Emancipation Proclamation Day/Juneteenth
III. Martin Luther King Jr. Day
IV. Church Anniversary
V. Pastor’s Anniversary
VI. Women’s Day
VII. Children’s Day
VIII. Men’s Day
IX. Black History Month
X. Homecoming/Revival
XI. Watch Night
XII. Usher Day

2012 Black History Month Observance

2012 Black History Month Observance
Class of 2012 Cadet Ashley Anthony performs "Ego Tripping" by Nikki Giovanni, as well as joining a group earlier in the dramatic interpretation o fthe song "Four Women" by Nina Simone. The 2012 Black History Month Observance at West Point featured powerhouse performances by cadets at Robinson Auditorium on Feb. 15. Class of 2015 Cadets Katherine Bullard and Sarah Locke, nearing the end of their first year at the academy, took on the enormous responsibilities as producer and choreographer, respectively. The theme of this year’s event was “The Influence of African American Women on Culture, Society and the Millitary, told through the Arts, and featured exciting performances of poems, songs and skit and dances. The guest speaker for the observance was Maj. Gen. Marcia Anderson, the first African-American female to earn the rank of major general in the Army. She was introduced by Pat Locke, who graduated from West Point with the first class of women in 1980, one of two African-American female cadets to commission as second lieutenants that year. Photo by Mike Strasser, West Point Public Affairs

Krystal Onyema BHM

Krystal Onyema BHM
Class of 2015 Cadet Krystal Onyema performs during the 2012 Black History Month Observance at West Point Feb. 15. The theme of this year’s event was “The Influence of African American Women on Culture, Society and the Military, told through the Arts, and featured exciting performances of poems, songs and skit and dances.

Cadets from the African American Arts Forum and Cadet Gospel Choir planned, rehearsed and delivered the annual performance, in keeping with the 2012 Department of Defense theme, “Black Women in American Culture and History.”

The guest speaker for the observance was Maj. Gen. Marcia Anderson, the first African-American female to earn the rank of major general in the Army. She was introduced by Pat Locke, who graduated from West Point with the first class of women in 1980, one of two African-American female cadets to commission as second lieutenants that year from the academy. Photo by Mike Strasser, West Point Public Affairs

black history skits

Plays for Pennies
Written by Gregory J. Lavelle (440) 724-4538, lavellearb@aim.com, this is a collection of plays which can be performed with little or no cost in terms of royalties, sets and constumes. One play, The High Road, is perfect for a Black History Month presentation since it contains historically accurate information about African-American pioneers in various fields and insights into slavery in American while stressing that education is the key to personal growth and freedom. There are two audience interactive plays with multiple endings so that the audience directs the outcome; A Question of Guilt – State v. Davis is a jury trial murder mystery with four possible endings. Branches is a science-fiction/fantasy where the audience sits as a part of a group-therapy session and decides the fate of a man, who through a magin potion, was able to visit branches in his life where he had faced life changing choices and to make the alternate choice. Jake’s Dilemma is a comedy about a paranoid old man who believes that tourist couple who visit his diner in the middle of nowhere in Arizona are from outer space. As Jake holds them at gumpoint, the husband makes wild admissions of being an alien, while the wife goes bonkers trying to convince Jake that her husband is making things up because he thinks that is what Jake wants to hear. Not to give away the ending, but the tagline of the play is, “Perhaps even a crazy squirrel finds an acorn now and again. In the collection are six short plays in various genre, one of which is a ribald comedy which would be a perfect thirty minute skit for St. Patrick’s Day.